Stumbling block to self-reliant Pakistan

January 14, 2019

When Pakistan is struggling to eliminate the difference between the rich and poor and make Pakistan stand on its feet, according to Federal Minister for Information and Broadcasting Fawad Chaudhry the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) government is under enormous pressure to strike deals with Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz (PML-N) leader Nawaz Sharif and Pakistan People’s Party (PPP) Co-Chairman Asif Ali Zardari. He said that PTI is receiving unsolicited advice from various quarters on how to deal with the cases against the former prime minister and former president adding that everyday there is someone telling us that our anti-corruption efforts are hampering the functioning of the parliament. Some people are advising us to go easy on Zardari and Nawaz Sharif; others want us to negotiate settlements. It is the same political elite of the country, more conspicuously the ones who are no longer in power, are all ganged up to thwart the prospect of progress and prosperity in the country. Such overtures will utterly disappoint anyone who is interested in seeing the advent of a confident, self-reliant country that would play a constructive role in empowering its people to break the shackles of poverty and backwardness. A state that was envisaged to take pride in being forbearing towards its citizens regardless of their faith, caste, color and creed started to descend deep into the throes of radicalization and extremism soon after its creation. And a state that was founded on the principles of evenhanded special consideration towards all its people as being first, second and last citizens of this state with equal rights, privileges and obligations divided them along the very same segregations, and rendering them brutally defenseless at the hands of vigilante justice perpetrated by those it had equipped with uneven power and rights. The state, therefore, was divided, at its very beginning, among the privileged and non-privileged classes. With time, the privileged dug in their heels to become the ruling elite and the non-privileged were left to fend off others’ bounty if and when it would be tossed their way. Seventy years is quite a long time in a nation’s history, chiefly through the budding years when the foundations of a new state are laid and it begins its journey to achieve a position of significance and protect the wellbeing of its people. That, unfortunately, has not been the case with Pakistan as, each new government that came into power, tried to stamp its own writ on the state in an rough and dictatorial manner which, over time, took it further away from the cherishing principles of its creation so expressively summarized in the Quaid’s address of August 11 from the floor of the first constituent assembly of the country.

 Seventy years is quite a long time in a nation’s history, chiefly through the budding years when the foundations of a new state are laid and it begins its journey to achieve a position of significance and protect the wellbeing of its people.