The US covert motives

January 22, 2019

The US President Donald Trump made an amazing declaration last month that Daesh terror group had been crushed in Syria and that US troops in the country would be coming home. That decision caught Washington unawares and generated extensive debate. But in thesucceeding weeks, both Trump and administration officials offered conflicting and confusing statements about the timing of the withdrawal and what the US strategy in Syria entails. Separately, the prospect of a pullout alarmed the Syrian Kurdish forces allied with the US. Kurdish officials said that they were seeking a deal with President Bashar al-Assad’s governmentKurds have inferred that they should not be used by the US any longer and therefore earnestly held talks with Syrian government. The US took advantage of the Syrian Kurds during the war on Syria. The US first selected some parts of Syria to be managed by Kurds, making them believe that the US wants to grant autonomy and sovereignty to them. But it was evident right from the start that the US was not prepared to enter a big political tension with Turkey over Kurds. The decision of US president to withdraw troops from Syria, made for whatever reason, does not confirm that the US is not going to get involved in regional issues anymore. We can perceive some motives for this decision. The US troops after pulling out of Syria may continue to support terrorists, morally and logistically, to create trouble in the region, thus paving the way for stouter return of the US troops later. Besides, this is a kind of ransom. The US desires some countries in the region pay more money if they want White House to keep its troops in the there. At the end of the day, Trump is an entrepreneur and his policies are more controlled by that mindset. It is also possible that the US troops pull out of Syria, with Washington then strengthening terrorists in Syria to show that other parties involved are not capable of controlling and settling things in Syria. Another problem is that the US wants to have a proxy presence in Syria. Countries like Turkey, Saudi Arabia and even France will replace US troops in Syria. The French are largely interested in playing this role as they have historically been present in Syria and like to still have a toe hold there. Maybe, the US wishes to apply more pressure on its European allies to invest more in the region in line with the US policies. These are all the motives that can be drawn for the US decision to pull out troops from Syria. We should be on the alert for any of these possibilities.

 

It is also possible that the US troops pull out of Syria, with Washington then strengthening terrorists in Syria to show that other parties involved are not capable of controlling and settling things in Syria. Another problem is that the US wants to have a proxy presence in Syria.